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Bagan-Myanmar

PostPosted: Fri Feb 20, 2009 3:44 am
by sandpan
The land of over 4000 temples. 1200AD.

PostPosted: Fri Feb 20, 2009 1:28 pm
by taf
incredible view... where it is ???

PostPosted: Fri Feb 20, 2009 6:21 pm
by sandpan
My friend came over yesterday and brought a bunch of photos that he had taken on some of his travels. He didn't have any stitching software so I got him to try out my auto pano pro. He is going to get it now but after the new version comes out. This photo was taken in Burma some place where the whole valley is like sacred or something , in the valley there are thousands of these temples. I am very envious I wasn't with him in this cool place. O well, at least I got to stitch it for him and now might have another friend to take pics with. I really liked the stitched pic and asked him if he would like the world to see it on the forum. He is all pumped about app and was more than ready to get involved with the posting of pictures on the forum. Anyway thank you Scott for sharing, but next time you will more than likely be on your own!!! Nice pic Scott!!

PostPosted: Sat Feb 21, 2009 9:45 am
by sandpan
smaller version since the big one has a bad frame in it .

PostPosted: Mon Feb 23, 2009 3:42 pm
by terryt
Cool photos, I like the more natural, less saturated photo on top. Sandpan, I know you didn't actually photograph this scene, but it would be better if the temples were slightly bigger in the photo. OR, if there was one temple up close with the others in the background to give the photo depth.

Indeed, this is Bagan, Myanmar (Burma). I was there in 2006. I hired a boy with his horse wagon, and we visited dozens of temples during the Ananda Festival. Most of the temples were fully vacant WITHOUT tourists. You could explore every nook and crany without any security guard or velvet rope! Unfortunately, I shot mostly single wide-angle lens photos without the need for autopano, thus, I have very few to post in this forum.

Sandpan, I hope to see more, I would love to relive my travels there.

thanks

PostPosted: Mon Feb 23, 2009 4:44 pm
by DrSlony
I'd like to see more, panos or not :]

terryt wrote:Most of the temples were fully vacant WITHOUT tourists. You could explore every nook and crany without any security guard or velvet rope!

Impossible, not on this planet and not in this century! ;)

PostPosted: Mon Feb 23, 2009 6:50 pm
by terryt
Hi DrSlony,

I love to travel, a big part of my selection process is by how unfettered my visit and photography will be.

Of all places I have so far visited, I was mostly impressed with the no-restrictions in Cambodia regarding the Khmer temples. Unfortunately, the down side to remote temples being unguarded means massive looting or potential damage . . .

In some places in Egypt, restrictions are lax. Great for photos, BUT, unfortunately this is also a big problem. It is not unusual to see some ignorant tourist rest against an unguarded thousandS-year-old mural, only to have the painting rub off on his back.

However, the opposite extreme is bad too. In America, our society is so worried about lawsuits, that many of our parks systems are lawyer-proofed behind very restricted fences/laws. I live in Buffalo, NY. Though winter snow life is a big part of our living, my government places heavy restrictions regarding park activities like ice-skating and sledding because of possible injuries. Sheesh. We've become a nation of wimps/babies that need protecting.

One day, I hope to visit Greece, but I am also told that access to the monuments are very, very restrictive there too. Maybe a forum member can comment? Once you have full access to many world sites, it is a great disappointment to be hindered.

Generally, I have found the philosophy of Europeans the best. I think because you have grown up with such great archaeological sites, there is naturally much respect. Yet, you don't overly protect them. Indeed, recently in Spain, I have found many medeval villages are being turned into living accomodations. Could any European forum member comment specifically about their location regarding this?

PostPosted: Mon Feb 23, 2009 8:34 pm
by DrSlony
Most places are accessible in Poland, but some require you to pay for photography, even if you want to take #### photos with a cellphone! An example is Wieliczka, a salt mine near Cracow. I was there recently for the second time in my life but I wasn't impressed much but it - it turned too much into a tourist cash cow, an amusement park. I wanted raw caves and salt water pools, unfortunately there were only two them during the whole trip.

Auschwitz, on the other hand, was very impressive, and free. I especially liked the fact that they didn't rebuild much.

terryt wrote:Though winter snow life is a big part of our living, my government places heavy restrictions regarding park activities like ice-skating and sledding because of possible injuries.

That's pathetic, and its happening in other countries too, such as in the UK. And the sad thing is that other countries will follow. I'm worring where this is all heading... 1984 doesn't sound too far off. When I read of all the rights that American citizens lately lost and the government gained, that scares me. Most of those citizens aren't aware of that because the government doesn't yet excercise them, but it CAN. We get used to being passive.

PostPosted: Mon Feb 23, 2009 9:31 pm
by terryt
DrSlony,

The great American inventor, journalist, printer, diplomat, and statesman Benjamin Franklin said: "They who give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." Unfortunately, when the population is deliberately kept scared by the government, the people easily forget about their rights and liberties.

Anyways, thanks for the Polish appraisal. Yes, I agree with you about caves, they almost always have restrictions. When I was in the Glowworm cave in New Zealand, there was absolutely no photo rule (a momentary flash mistake could harm the delicate gloworm ecosystem). Also, I think it was Taf who posted some cave photos recently that said he had to go on a special tour that allows photos. Oh well. Good that Auschwitz is free.

Religious temple restrictions are also interesting. Muslim mosques are generally OK to photograph inside. Some christian churches have restrictions (usually just no flash). Hindu temples; as a non-hindu, forget about the camera, sometimes even I cannot get entry. : )

Any other European to comment about their country's restrictiveness?

PostPosted: Tue Feb 24, 2009 8:17 pm
by sandpan
Unfortunately nearly all of the government officials now days do not beleive in the principals on which our country was founded like those of Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson. This president is bringing us into a socialist state at warp speed and starting today the beginning of the nationalization of our bank system has started. Our freedoms are being frittered away and the nation is asleep and is going to be in bondage and won't even care untill it is to late. Sorry about the negativity , there is a better day a coming , this can not be fixed by humans at this point, only by a higher power called God.
Scott took the pictures with an old an old G5 canon. I wish he would have had something with a higher pixel count like the G10 but they turned out pretty well. I really like that G10 and will get one sometime in the future but there are higher priorities right now. My rebel xti will have to do

PostPosted: Wed Feb 25, 2009 6:17 pm
by terryt
sandpan,

Yes, I agree, Americans get the government they deserve. Thus, we shouldn't be surprised at the mess we are in. Anyways, this is off-topic.

However, the G10 camera IS on-topic! I fooled with one in a Best BUY store last week. I think I am gonna get it. I love the hard-controls on top (no soft menus to endlessly navigate). Not sure of the battery life though. I often travel to places where there is no electricity for re-charging. How many back-up batteries should I get? Anyone comment? I seen battery prices from $40-120USD. Yikes. Also, I REALLY need a wide-angle lens for travel. I think the G10 has a 28mm equivilant. Not great, but since Autopano came around, I can extend the view range.

Anyone have a G10 to comment?

PostPosted: Wed Feb 25, 2009 8:35 pm
by sandpan
a friend of mine has a G10 and really loves it, there are two lenses you can get for the camera one being a telephoto and the other a
15-70 mm 140 degree wide angle . the reason it is called a zoom is because of the zoom of the camera itself. The lens looks like it slides over the top of the other lens and then the main lens of the camera works normally going in and out of the inside of the wide angle lens. I believe the telephoto works much the same. Someone can correct me if I am wrong, but that is what it appears to me.

PostPosted: Wed Feb 25, 2009 9:56 pm
by kzaugg
@terryt

I have a G10, and really like it. I typically get ~300 shots from a battery charge, maybe more, I don't like to let it get too low. I have one extra battery, and that seems to meet all my needs.

The G10 is awesome for panos during the day. As the light starts to drop, I still prefer my DSLR because anything over ISO 200 on the G10 starts to get noisy. The build quality of the G10 still continues to please me....it feels great in your hand.

@sandpan -- we need to get out and take some pictures to stitch!

Kendall

PostPosted: Wed Feb 25, 2009 10:12 pm
by terryt
kzaugg and sandpan,

Thanks for the G10 comments. Kendall, are you sandpan's G10 friend?

One other concern: the G10's lens only goes to F8? Comment?

Kendall
"anything over ISO 200 on the G10 starts to get noisy."
Hmm, that might be bad for me. I take alot of night/dark photos.

sandpan
"...has a 15-70 mm 140 degree wide angle".
This would be great news, but . . .
I have usually found add-on lens to be deteriorating quality. Usually there is a marked addition of colour aberations/rainbows and soft focus on the outer images. Can you confirm the quality of the add-on lens?

I will check into these possible G10 negatives,

THANKS!

PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2009 5:41 pm
by sandpan
I personally don't know any one that has the wide angle add on lens, I think more people get the telephoto add on lens for making the giga pan images . I believe that is what was used on yosemite valley to make that huge picture.

PostPosted: Fri Feb 27, 2009 8:08 am
by guachinver
Another pano of Bagan, 2004.
Incredible place on a beatifull country.
I must remake this Pano with AP because remember I have had a lot of problems.
40 images Nikon E995 tele 256mm.

PostPosted: Fri Feb 27, 2009 5:41 pm
by sandpan
Wow, I really got to go to this place. Did you take just one row or two? The detail seems to be a bit better than my friends pic . I would love to see this pic larger that what the parameters of this forum allow. cool place and well done!

PostPosted: Fri Feb 27, 2009 6:21 pm
by terryt
Wow,

Awesome pano guachinver. I photographed a similar viewpoint, but this one is better because it has much better resolution and it compresses the temples into eachother. Truly represents a valley of a thousand temples.

I think mine also had those same damn telephone wires. They are hellish to remove in photoshop, but for this photo's sake, I encourage you to do it.

Sandpan and Guachinver, thanks and I encourage you to post more Bagan photos.

BTW, I have a china trip coming up in April. I am going to try to create the worlds longest pano of the Great Wall of China using 1:1 scale ratio!!!

(ha ha about the ratio. serious about the trip)

T

PostPosted: Sun Mar 01, 2009 12:47 pm
by guachinver
terryt wrote:BTW, I have a china trip coming up in April. I am going to try to create the worlds longest pano of the Great Wall of China using 1:1 scale ratio!!!

(ha ha about the ratio. serious about the trip)

T

Terryt, because you plans to have a china trip in April I'll post another pano at gallery.


Today I recovered the Bagan, Myanmar snapshots from 2004 then AP has executed quickly and correctly 10 ':P';
Four years ago I lasted more than 15 hours editing in Photoshop the bagan's sunset pano for obtain a 2.5 meters Photo of 305 ppi resolution. Today with the image result from AP 30 minuts of edition suffit. I like AP a lot, it do a very good work with Histogram balancing and blending images. ':cool:';
Two more panos from the same place, one has the images taken in the morning and the other at sunset.
Bagan 2004 the sunset pano has 3 rows taked with a 320 mm tele.
I post another pano, it is a little part of a full spherical pano hanheld shooted with missing images:

PostPosted: Sun Mar 01, 2009 6:23 pm
by sandpan
When you were inside the temple of the last image ,did you notice if the pillars were made of jade and then covered with the gold leaf or what? They are very beautiful . I just can't imagine such a poor country putting so much money into all these temples when there is so much poverty. And lastly do most of the temples have at least some of this ornamentation in them?

PostPosted: Mon Mar 02, 2009 2:01 pm
by guachinver
sandpan wrote:When you were inside the temple of the last image ,did you notice if the pillars were made of jade and then covered with the gold leaf or what? They are very beautiful . I just can't imagine such a poor country putting so much money into all these temples when there is so much poverty. And lastly do most of the temples have at least some of this ornamentation in them?

Sorry, perhaps I am confusing you. The rich decorated temple is not in Bagan. The pano is from Swedagon Pagoda, so called Golden Pagoda, at Yangon, Burma.

PostPosted: Mon Mar 02, 2009 3:24 pm
by terryt
sandpan writes:
"I just can't imagine such a poor country putting so much money into all these temples when there is so much poverty."

When in Myanmar, I understood it is the duty or responsibility of the people to construct such temples to assure a better next life. I was flabbergasted to tour one such temple that had a HUGE carved marble Buddha inside. To keep the marble from cracking, it was completely enclosed in a glass shelled building, which inside was AIR-CONDITIONED. Outside, people live subsistent lives. Go figure.

guachinver,

I can relate to your laborious multi-day-photoshop story. I have more than one of those early pano-photos that I attempted to hand-stitch. No more with Autopano, though.

More beautiful photos. I'll probably never re-visit Myanmar (there are so many other places in the world to visit first). I wish I had shot panos like you, but it was before I knew about stitching software. Love the Swedagon Pagoda photo, great composition. (small nitpick, there might be a slight digital error on the right column, perhaps you can fix?)

Looking forward to some Chinese photos.

regards,
Terry