Lough Key, Co. Roscommon, Ireland.  

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oreillyfotograf
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Lough Key, Co. Roscommon, Ireland.

by oreillyfotograf » Sun Sep 30, 2012 11:27 pm

Hi All,

Hope you all had a good weekend. With the weather being favorable on Saturday morning. I took myself to the shores of Lough Key, Co. Roscommon. Looking across at Hoggs Island and waiting for sunrise.

Enjoy...

Image
Last edited by oreillyfotograf on Sun Sep 30, 2012 11:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Kind regards,

Niall
Fuji Stuff!!

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disneytoy
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by disneytoy » Tue Oct 02, 2012 6:31 pm

I'm brand new. I have only done 360 stitches. I would like to try a Pano like yours. I'm guessing you are using a full frame sensor. You are shooting Vertical frames.

What focal lenght are you shooting?

How many Horizontal exposures?

Is this a single row, how many rows then?

I just need a starting point.

I'm in California. Thank you!
Last edited by disneytoy on Tue Oct 02, 2012 6:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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oreillyfotograf
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by oreillyfotograf » Sun Oct 07, 2012 9:14 pm

Disneytoy,

Thanks for your kind words.

I shoot all my Panos in fully manual mode, switch off all Auto settings. Fixed ISO, Manual Exposure with fixed shutter and f stop. Then when it comes to stitching, all your frames will be similarily exposed. You will need to use your light meter in the camera to measure the the scene, both bright and dark areas. Then pick some where in the middle of these readings for an exposure. If your camera has an RGB histogram try and shoot to the right, where you can. I mean keeping any of the R,G,or B colour channels over to the RHS of the screen. This can ofter be difficult as you can see very little RGB in these scenes. Try tweeking your exposure for the desired result. Always watch your light meter on each exposure as it can shift significantly.

Once in location, I get my camera attached to my Nodal Ninja head and get it levelled off, then I'll pick a point in the scene to focus on, switch off focus on the Lens to avoid any focus shifts. Apply shutter and f stop based on metering the scene. I also use a Polaris light meter, but not necessary.

This particular scene comprised of two rows, with 43 frames shot at 24mm.

In some ways Pano shoots like this can be like sending your film off to the lab for processing, becuse you never really know what you have managed to capture until you get your images uploaded.

Hope this is of help to you, looking forward to seeing your images soon.
Last edited by oreillyfotograf on Sun Oct 07, 2012 9:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Kind regards,

Niall
Fuji Stuff!!

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disneytoy
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by disneytoy » Mon Oct 08, 2012 4:44 am

Very impressive,

I'll assuming these are PORTRAIT shots. Half of 43 exposures (2 rows) is around 21. A 24mm lens is pretty wide to begin with 84 degrees x 53 degrees.

Without overlap you'd have 1,113 degrees. With 30 percent overlap on each side would leave 445 degrees?

Are these shots bracketed?

I'm guessing this is about a finished 180 degree shot?

Thanks

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oreillyfotograf
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by oreillyfotograf » Mon Oct 08, 2012 11:50 pm

Disneytoy,

You are correct, I omitted the orientation Portrait and I use 10 degree detent on my pano head. Another point too is I switch off AWB.

I don't get too hung up on degrees of view, just capture the scene and hope they stitch together well!!

Regards,

Niall
Kind regards,

Niall
Fuji Stuff!!

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snaefell
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by snaefell » Tue Oct 09, 2012 7:43 am

disneytoy wrote:Very impressive,

I'll assuming these are PORTRAIT shots. Half of 43 exposures (2 rows) is around 21. A 24mm lens is pretty wide to begin with 84 degrees x 53 degrees.

Without overlap you'd have 1,113 degrees. With 30 percent overlap on each side would leave 445 degrees?

To add something (since I mostly do this type of panorama and almost no 360 :-) ): This kind of panorama can be done with almost all types of lenses. For picking details of landscape I have often used tele lenses up to 300mm length. It is simply try and find-out. The other thing is that (given there is enough light) it is not always necessary to use a tripod. When I have been on hikes, I don't always have one with me, with some expirience you can do this panos free hand (especially when they are single row). So its just a matter of going out and trying it.

best

Chris

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snaefell
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by snaefell » Tue Oct 09, 2012 7:45 am

oreillyfotograf wrote:Hi All,

Hope you all had a good weekend. With the weather being favorable on Saturday morning. I took myself to the shores of Lough Key, Co. Roscommon. Looking across at Hoggs Island and waiting for sunrise.

Hi, this is another one of your images I like. And you don't have to get up that early at this time of the year :)

best

Christian


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