Portrait or Landscape  

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gloob
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Portrait or Landscape

by gloob » Sat Apr 16, 2011 5:51 pm

Hello,

I just wanted to ask you if you prefer to use the camera in portrait or landscape mode?

Maybe you could discripe why you us it that way.

Thanks
Stefan

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by fma38 » Sun Apr 17, 2011 8:27 am

Portrait is better when shooting 1 row panos, as you get a larger vertical fov. I think it is better for multiple rows too. For shperical panos, I don't know if it really matter...
Frédéric

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by mediavets » Sun Apr 17, 2011 8:58 am

fma38 wrote:Portrait is better when shooting 1 row panos, as you get a larger vertical fov. I think it is better for multiple rows too. For shperical panos, I don't know if it really matter...

If you use the Merlin for shooting spherical panos indoors then you will need to mount the camera/lens at the NPP and it's almost impossible to do that with the camera in landscape orientation.
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by fma38 » Sun Apr 17, 2011 9:28 am

Right!
Frédéric

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by gloob » Sun Apr 17, 2011 11:25 am

I don't want to shoot spherical panos with the merlin. I will just use it for outside gigapixel images. I thought the gigapan uses landscape mode so this must have a reason.
For shooting and stitching there should be no difference between both modes when shooting gigapixel images or I'm wrong?

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by GURL » Sun Apr 17, 2011 11:31 am

gloob, you should say why you are asking this question: for which kind of panos, which camera and lens, which pano-head, etc.

For heavy cameras the torque resulting from the pano-head asymmetry is a nuisance and portrait orientation is preferable (less torque.) On the contrary, that Gigapan pano-head uses landscape orientation is related to its U-shaped camera support.

For a pano along the horizon, 2 rows in portrait orientation - where the sky row is easily linked to the ground row - is clearly preferable. For a 360x180° and when using a fisheye where FOV is 95° x 145°, two opposite portrait and two opposite landscape + zenith + nadir would result in a 6 shoots only pano.

The right answer could be: use a square sensor where image circle is completely covered! :rolleyes: ;) :cool:

Lenses are now much more expensive than a single sensor, even a "too large one", and a (mirrorless) camera built for panoramas would include a sensor large enough to avoid wasting any image part...

Conclusion: using a (yet to come) fulframe mirrorless camera and an APS-C series of lenses would make sense (provided this camera is less expensive than current FF DSLR.)
Last edited by GURL on Sun Apr 17, 2011 12:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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by klausesser » Sun Apr 17, 2011 12:37 pm

fma38 wrote:For shperical panos, I don't know if it really matter...

Hi Frédéric!

I don´t think it really matters - BUT :cool: : regarding a descending number of shots in the upper rows and the down rows i guess it´s easier to calculate a portait-oriented picture in terms of overlap?

Having tried both positionings i prefer the portrait mode. I experienced nevertheless that with moving clouds in the field the cloud-moving is usually better captured in landscape mode because of lesser horizontal shots duie to wider angles.

best to you (how´s building you new home?), Klaus
Last edited by klausesser on Sun Apr 17, 2011 12:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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by klausesser » Sun Apr 17, 2011 12:44 pm

GURL wrote:Conclusion: using a (yet to come) fulframe mirrorless camera and an APS-C series of lenses would make sense (provided this camera is less expensive than current FF DSLR.)

How are they building a mirrorless camera? I know it from a Canon DSLR specieliased on sports: they had a beamsplitter instead of a mirror so that the camera could shoot with higher frequencies. But the splitter sucks light-intensity of course - guess it was 1 step at least.
The other way would be to have a permanent live-view . . is it? (didn´t ever care for that theme).

best, Klaus
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by GURL » Sun Apr 17, 2011 7:15 pm

klausesser wrote:How are they building a mirrorless camera? I know it from a Canon DSLR specieliased on sports: they had a beamsplitter instead of a mirror so that the camera could shoot with higher frequencies. But the splitter sucks light-intensity of course - guess it was 1 step at least.
The other way would be to have a permanent live-view . . is it? (didn´t ever care for that theme).

Besides Canon and Nikon, nearly all manufacturers are now making mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras. All of them use a live-view rear screen but most add an EVF (Electronic View Finder.) Mirror mechanics and prism being expensive is one reason for that, a resulting smaller camera another reason. Most use especially designed, smaller and non-retrofocus lenses. EVF quality and focusing speed vary widely. This new trend began for 4/3 sensors but APS-C sensors mirrorless are now common. There is a Nikon full-frame mirrorless rumor, too...

The most interesting one could be the 24mm x 18mm sensor Panasonic GH2 wich is both a fine "large sensor" video camera and a very decent "small sensor" still camera where many new or existing lenses (Leica ones included) can be used.

Sony SLT-A55 camera use a "translucent" (:rolleyes: !) mirror but that's for a faster focusing only...
Georges

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by Asher Kelman » Sun Apr 17, 2011 7:30 pm

klausesser wrote:
fma38 wrote:For shperical panos, I don't know if it really matter...

Hi Frédéric!

I don´t think it really matters - BUT :cool: : regarding a descending number of shots in the upper rows and the down rows i guess it´s easier to calculate a portait-oriented picture in terms of overlap?

Having tried both positionings i prefer the portrait mode. I experienced nevertheless that with moving clouds in the field the cloud-moving is usually better captured in landscape mode because of lesser horizontal shots duie to wider angles.

best to you (how´s building you new home?), Klaus

Klaus,

Imagine taking pictures with a 50 mm lens for detail in a 360 degree pano. At the end, for moving clouds, how about several quick shots with a fisheye? Then mask out all the other sky on the 50 mm shots before stitching. After all, resolution in the clouds in pretty important.

Asher
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by klausesser » Sun Apr 17, 2011 9:54 pm

Asher Kelman wrote:Imagine taking pictures with a 50 mm lens for detail in a 360 degree pano. At the end, for moving clouds, how about several quick shots with a fisheye? Then mask out all the other sky on the 50 mm shots before stitching. After all, resolution in the clouds in pretty important.

Asher

Hi Asher!

Yes, that´s done often. But i don´t really like it - depending on how scalable you need the image you will see lots of artifacts in the sky . . . imagine you shot wonderful clouds . . and then have them look ugly . . . :cool:

best to you, Klaus
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