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Adding "fake" sky to a gigapixel panorama

PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2012 4:50 pm
by Zurich.Gigapixel
Hi

I'm talking about this picture: http://www.360cities.net/london-photo-en.html

I guess (and please correct me if I'm wrong) they shot a high resolution image of the city and then put a lower resolution image of the sky on top of it.
IMHO they didn't shot the sky the same way they shot the city, this would have been total madness.

If what I'm guessing is right: How did they do it?
Btw: They used an 400mm lens for city.

Thanks for any help in advance ;)

PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2012 5:05 pm
by a a gruntpuddock
Doesn't look like they merged two separate shots, there would be some atrifacts.

They might have shot the city very carefully using a long focal length then shot the sky at wide angle to get it done quickly, then used all the shots to create a single pano.

UPDATE

Wrong, as usual!

http://blog.360cities.net/london-gigapixel-faq/

PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2012 5:05 pm
by AlexandreJ
Photoshoping by part was the solution.
In fact, it was 4 panoramas blended together in photoshop.
They had a giant hardware with 192G RAM ... it helped for that task.

PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2012 7:37 pm
by gddxb
I'm confused.

Was the London 80GP image shot at full resolution for the whole sphere or not?

PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2012 7:40 pm
by Zurich.Gigapixel
gddxb wrote:Was the London 80GP image shot at full resolution for the whole sphere or not?

IMHO atleast I don't think they did the sky with the same 400mm lens...
The sky would look totally different I think...

PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2012 8:56 pm
by Zurich.Gigapixel
AlexandreJ wrote:They had a giant hardware with 192G RAM ... it helped for that task.

...christmas is still far away :(

a a gruntpuddock wrote:They might have shot the city very carefully using a long focal length then shot the sky at wide angle to get it done quickly, then used all the shots to create a single pano.

Would that be possible?
Is it possible to make a gigapixel panorama with 400mm and then add the sky which was shot with (lets say) 50mm?
And load that whole thing into autopano? I don't see how this would work, especially if you're using the gigapan importer or an xml-File...

Is that theoretically possible to do?

PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2012 9:46 pm
by gkaefer
Zurich.Gigapixel wrote:
AlexandreJ wrote:They had a giant hardware with 192G RAM ... it helped for that task.

...christmas is still far away :(

a a gruntpuddock wrote:They might have shot the city very carefully using a long focal length then shot the sky at wide angle to get it done quickly, then used all the shots to create a single pano.

Would that be possible?
Is it possible to make a gigapixel panorama with 400mm and then add the sky which was shot with (lets say) 50mm?
And load that whole thing into autopano? I don't see how this would work, especially if you're using the gigapan importer or an xml-File...

Is that theoretically possible to do?

it works. different focals with up to 1:4 can be combined (only dont mix fisheye and non fisheye images), so every focal is organized in autopano in a seperate group, you than get for each group a pano. each pano using photoshop & co to alpha layer & make transparent the part you dont wanns see. than blend it in PS or even take the alpha layerd panos and load them to autopano again... and make the final pano...
So 20mm, 55mm, 80mm and 200mm and 400mm can be combined in this way...
Georg

PostPosted: Sun Aug 26, 2012 9:47 pm
by doc
Zurich.Gigapixel wrote:Is it possible to make a gigapixel panorama with 400mm and then add the sky which was shot with (lets say) 50mm?
And load that whole thing into autopano? I don't see how this would work, especially if you're using the gigapan importer or an xml-File...

This is one of the things I've always loved about AutoPano - the ability to merge shots of different focal lengths. There's been some bugs doing it over the years, but recent versions seem to work well.

For all of my shots I always shoot at 400mm for the main shoot, but the do the extremes (water, sky, etc) at either100mm or 200mm - often even changing from portrate to landscape at the same time.

This does mean that you end up with extrapolation (and thus lower quality) for the areas only covered by the 100mm, but given that we're talking sky, who cares!

http://www.docbert.org/SydneyByNight/ is an example of doing this going back over 6 years.