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Position only?

PostPosted: Thu Jun 14, 2012 9:20 am
by darinb
Is there a way using Autopano to arrange a set of images with no adjustments other than positioning the images, rotating them if needed? I don't want any blending or any changes to the rectangular shape of the images.

Thanks!

--Darin

PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 8:33 pm
by DrSlony
Yes, just turn off blending in the render settings and optionally render each source image to a PSD layer. As for the reprojection of the images, that depends on the images. What have you shot, what focal length, what field of view of the whole pano, and what are you trying to achieve?

PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 10:52 pm
by darinb
Hi,

What I have is a video shot by another photographer. The question is, did the photographer tilt the footage at the end of the video as compared to the beginning of the video? (It is a journalistic video--the tilt question is important to the integrity of the image).

I thought one way to answer the question would be to take a series of frame grabs from the video sequence (it is about seven seconds long and involves a simple pan from left to right). I did the frame grabs and tried to line them up by eye in photoshop but that is very difficult and may introduce error. So then I thought that AutoPano might do the trick.

I imported the ten screen grabs into AutoPano and ran the program without blending. But the program still changed the rectangular images into trapezoids.

What I would love to get to is just the rectangular images layed across each other with no blending and no changes to their shape. Rotate is o.k. (it will be required) and zoom may or may not be needed, but no other changes.

I do not know what focal length was used nor any other details of the footage. I can send you the screen grabs if that would make more sense.

Thanks,

--Darin

PostPosted: Mon Jun 18, 2012 2:47 pm
by hankkarl
If the photog was panning, then you should have a trapezoid. Think of panning a long wall. You will see parallax, and APP will try and project the wall onto a sphere, keeping the wall height the same. Thus, it "keystones" the image in the horizontal direction.

One way around this may be to set the focal length to 1000 or more.

PostPosted: Mon Jun 18, 2012 3:50 pm
by klausesser
darinb wrote:Hi,

What I have is a video shot by another photographer. The question is, did the photographer tilt the footage at the end of the video as compared to the beginning of the video? (It is a journalistic video--the tilt question is important to the integrity of the image).

I thought one way to answer the question would be to take a series of frame grabs from the video sequence (it is about seven seconds long and involves a simple pan from left to right). I did the frame grabs and tried to line them up by eye in photoshop but that is very difficult and may introduce error. So then I thought that AutoPano might do the trick.

I imported the ten screen grabs into AutoPano and ran the program without blending. But the program still changed the rectangular images into trapezoids.

What I would love to get to is just the rectangular images layed across each other with no blending and no changes to their shape. Rotate is o.k. (it will be required) and zoom may or may not be needed, but no other changes.

I do not know what focal length was used nor any other details of the footage. I can send you the screen grabs if that would make more sense.

Thanks,

--Darin

Hope i understand you correct:

You have a VIDEO? That means a sequence of 25/30 frames per second. You extracted the single images from 7 seconds (7x25/30) and want you make them an interactive pano? Or what do you want to achive?

So i guess you have a cylindrical projection!? Did the videographer move theh camera up and down or straight horizontal?

Some mor edetailed information would be nice if you want to get help . . . :cool:

best, Klaus

Take in account that the exposure-time of the images was about 1/25 or 1/30sec. Doing a pan it´s most likely that the single images are blurred. You wouldn´t see that in the movie - but you see it in each sà­ngle picture extracted from the movie. Depends on the speed off panning. 1/25 or 1/30sec is rather slow for a moving camera.